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Mauritius

Welcome to the price transmission page for Mauritius. This page enables you to look into the country and its crops more specifically to gain an understanding of the level of risk and also, to view its historic warning periods per commodity. Select a time range or a specific date to view the data in more detail.

Mauritius

Historic Warnings per Commodity

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Background information

The island nation transformed from an agriculture-dependent country to a more diversified economy since its independence in 1968. Tourism and FDI have now become important sources of income, making the economy however also dependent on the performance of its trade partners. The share of the service sector (information and communications technology as well as finance) in GDP is increasing. Mauritius ranks as an upper middle-income country and is the most competitive economy in sub-Saharan Africa.

The importance of agriculture has declined through the past decades: nowadays only around one-tenth of the population is working in agriculture or fishing. Sugarcane as the most important crop is cultivated on the majority of the agricultural land area and contributes significantly to export revenues. Other crops include tea, corn, potatoes, bananas, pulses and livestock next to fishing. Since sugarcane accounts for most of the agricultural output, basic staples such as cereals need to be imported.

At the micro level, the steady and sustained growth of the economy resulted in major achievements such as higher life expectancy and lower infant mortality. With a value of 0.777, Mauritius ranks in the high human development category according to the HDI (2014). Nevertheless, about one-fifth of the population aged 15-24 is unemployed. Wasting remains a severe issue as well: one-tenth of the children under the age of five are affected (GHI 2015). High population density rates and consequently high urbanization rates also call for action.